Voting for the South Australian Agricultural Town of the Year Award is now open!

The Agricultural Town of the Year Award, proudly presented by the Department of Primary Industries and Regions (PIRSA) and Solstice Media, highlights the vital role that agriculture plays in the regional landscape – being the backbone of most regional communities.

This year the program received 70 town nominations and all South Australian residents are now invited to help select the Top 5 finalists for the 2020 Agricultural Town of the Year Award!

Your vote could help that town be selected as one of the Top 5 finalists, and have the opportunity to be crowned the 2020 Ag Town of the Year.

Submit your vote today via the links below.

Vote for the 2020 Agricultural Town of the Year Finalists

Step 1: Review the below list of 70 nominated towns and the information provided.

Step 2: Select ONE Agricultural Town from the list that you feel has helped grow primary industries and driven regional development the most, and should be recognised as the 2020 Ag Town of the Year.

Your choice and vote could help that town be selected as one of the Top 5 finalists, and have the opportunity to be crowned the 2020 Ag Town of the Year.

When making your selection please consider one of more of the following:

  • How the town and farming community helped grow primary industries to drive regional development?
  • Their agricultural contribution to the South Australian economy
  • Community spirit and resilience
  • Agricultural practices and innovation/initiatives

By submitting a vote, you agree to accept the terms and conditions of nominating for the 2020 South Australian Agricultural Town of the Year Award

Balaklava

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for: Cereal Crops | Other Broadacre crops | Livestock Meat and Wool
Council: Wakefield Regional Council
Population: 1,092
One of the main agricultural townships in the area, Balaklava connects grain silos through the state rail network and is a regional centre for both broadacre primary produce and value-adding chains including export hay processing, durum wheat and lentils.

Agricultural Overview

Balco’s main production site burned down in January 2017. As one of the town’s largest employers, this was a massive blow. A combination of voluntary staff contributions and relocations helped the company survive and rebuild over the next 24 months. Rather than cash in on its fallen competitor, Gilmac, also based locally, instead helped Balco continue production during this period, allowing it to function and trade. This combination enabled Balaklava to retain a major employer in the agricultural centre.

Community/Town Spirit

The annual show (although cancelled in 2020) is a great form of entertainment and brings community spirit to the town by the producers, residents and visitors getting to experience everything the town has to offer.

More than a quarter of residents in the area are directly employed through agriculture, while the second largest industry, manufacturing (16%), is largely supported by the agricultural sector.

More information

Two of the nation’s largest hay exporters, Balco and Gilmac, are based in Balaklava, while the durum wheat silos in the town supplies San Remo with the grain for its famous pasta.

Balco gets its name from “Balaklava Company”.

“An entrepreneurial agricultural community, with a strong focus on diversification and value-adding chains.”

AG Town - Balaklava
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Berri

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for: Grapes (Wine and Table) | Vegetables | Citrus Fruit
Council:
Berri Barmera Council
Population:
4,088
Berri is well known for its success in horticulture, especially the growth of oranges and grapes – it is the original home of a juice company, Berri Ltd. Berri is also surrounded by 3,000 hectares of irrigated fruit orchards, and is known for industries including fruit packing and wine.

Agricultural Overview

In the early 90s, land was set aside in Berri for an experimental irrigation farm, which focused on developing production techniques for irrigated tree crops and irrigation studies. This program also allowed for many soldiers, returning from WW2, to learn how to become farmers.

Community/Town Spirit

Berri hosts the Riverland Wine & Food Festival, celebrating and showcasing the Riverland region’s food, wine and produce – delivering social and economic benefits to the community.

AG Town - Berri
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Booleroo Centre

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for: Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Other Broadacre crops
Council:
District Council of Mount Remarkable
Population: 289
The local farmers of Booleroo Centre have adapted to climate changes through crop rotation, machinery development and the use of fertilisers. The town continues to develop in the agriculture space.

Community/Town Spirit

The best thing about Booleroo is the sense of community and how people never stop helping each other.

More information

Booleroo Centre is the Agricultural ‘Hub’ town of Mount Remarkable through several Ag businesses including Flinders Machinery, Northern Ag, and a major Farming Group who develop several cropping trial sites and information sharing.

“A small gem in SA’s upper north.”

AG Town - Booleroo Centre
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Bordertown

Region: Limestone Coast
Known for: Livestock Meat and Wool | Vegetables | Crops for Hay
Council:
Tatiara District Council
Population:
2,669
Bordertown is located in the Tatiara region of the Limestone Coast. The economic prosperity of the region is closely tied to the agricultural sector and is well regarded for the quality and reliability of its productive capability.

Agricultural Overview

Primary production and associated food processing and value-add services are key economic drivers. The agricultural base is supported with it’s diversity, comprising viticulture, horticulture, irrigated small seed crops, mixed broadacre dry-land cropping, hay production and grazing. Livestock enterprises are principally wool, prime lambs and beef cattle. This is all comprised with good soils, reasonable rainfall, accessible aquifers and a temperate climate. Bordertown has paved the way in hemp and beef production. The cropping sector is one of the best in the state with an estimated bumper harvest this year which will help to boost the Australian economy.

In response to the challenges posed by COVID-19 over the last many months, our local businesses have continued to provide their services in innovative ways and adapted to the challenging times. Our community’s focus to support their local business was also very evident with increased activity and demand throughout the town. The agriculture sector was not as affected as other industries, its reliance on local business provided the backbone and continued to stimulate our local economy during tough times.

Bordertown’s diverse and innovative industries include major meat processor, JBS Australia which is the largest employer in the district of over 450 staff, processing over 4500 lambs per day with plans to step this up to 6,000 lambs per day and employ another 110 staff. Blue Lake Milling is another leading employer, with over 100 employees and manufacturer of premium Australian oats and grain products. Blue Lake Milling this year has also started construction of an anaerobic digestion plant which, through a process of generating methane gas (Biogas) from oat husks will turn this fuel into a combined heat and power generator unit.

Community/Town Spirit

Bordertown provides a great lifestyle with many local service, community and sporting groups with good facilities. The local schools also encourage and promote agriculture in their curriculum, with the High School providing an agricultural subject and participating in events including the Adelaide Show. All primary industries helped the cross border communities to have access to services when unable to visit South Australia during border closes in the COVID19 pandemic. Bordertown also has a good compliment of local retail and professional business and services that provide great service to the community. Bordertown’s many other local business include a strong focus on manufacturing, logistics, and are well supported by the local Tatiara Business Association. This group hosts an annual Employment Expo in the local civic centre where job opportunities are highlighted and provide career pathway options for senior students. This year’s expo included over 23 local organisations including experts in training, industrial, agricultural and professional practices. The town and district’s strong agricultural section has driven business in the region and allowed for great employment prospects.

More information

Bordertown is the gateway to South Australia, situated on the Dukes Highway, 280km from Adelaide and 450km from Melbourne. The town was established in 1852 adjacent to the Tatiara Creek, the site of a base camp created by Police Inspector Alexander Tolmer, who was in charge of the gold escorts from the Victorian Goldfields to Adelaide. These historic escorts saved a young South Australia from bankruptcy, delivering much needed funds into state coffers, and their importance is recognised by the granite stone markers and plaques along the gold route. These days, Bordertown is known for its Walkway Gallery, which hosts national and state touring exhibitions, Bob Hawke Gallery, the faithfully restored Clayton Heritage Farm Museum where you can experience farm life as it was more than a century ago, and of course, its white kangaroos.

“The Bordertown Industrial Estate is a hive of activity with businesses supplying and servicing the agricultural sector”

AG Town - Bordertown
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Bowhill

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for: Livestock Meat and Wool | Grapes (Wine and Table) | Citrus Fruit
Council: Mid Murray Council
Population: 138
Bowhill is surrounded by riverside farmland, potato and onion growers with a progressive agricultural mindset among local farmers.

Community/Town Spirit

Land was set aside in Berri for an experimental irrigation farm, which focused on developing production techniques for irrigated tree crops and irrigation studies. This program also allowed for many soldiers, returning from WWII, to learn how to become farmers.

AG Town - Bowhill
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Ceduna

Region: Western Eyre Peninsula
Known for: Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Seafood
Council: District Council of Ceduna
Population:
2,157
Ceduna has seen a high level of economic growth through the tourism, aquaculture and mining industries. This has resulted in the demand for increased services, increased interest in land development and the creation of many new job opportunities in the agricultural sector.

Agricultural Overview

Provision of Traffic Management solutions for the Ceduna Bulk Storage Facilities to provide additional safety to both farmers and other road users during grain harvest.

Construction of purpose build boat ramp for aquaculture industry in Smoky Bay.

Community/Town Spirit

Ceduna is set amidst a patchwork of grain farms, natural bush and rugged rocky bays, secluded white sandy beaches and ever-changing seas, and has a reputation as an ideal tourist destination, with its abundant seafood, footprint-free beaches and wilderness, spectacular sunsets, whale watching and friendly people.

AG Town - Ceduna
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Clare

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for: Cereal Crops  | Livestock Meat and Wool | Grapes (Wine and Table)
Council:
Clare & Gilbert Valleys Council 
Population:
3,327
Clare is the major service centre for the surrounding district of broad acre farmers, wine & grape producers and wool producers. Surrounded by vineyards, the town also contributes with cereal crops and sheep farming.

Agricultural Overview

Council works to ensure that farm produce and supplies can easily be trucked in and out of the narrow valley by providing an excellent network of roads and undertaking maintenance and upgrades as required. With the district having experienced two years of drought, council has tried to minimise the impact on the broader community by undertaking activities and projects to support local businesses and shore up community centres that directly support farmers.

Community/Town Spirit

The town fosters a strong tourism sector which directly helps to promote the regions wines, meat and grains by making the town an attractive destination and supporting a restaurant sector that focus on local and regional produce.

The town has seen collaboration within supply chains to improve efficiencies within primary industries and differentiate end products. Businesses within the city are working to add value to the produce they grow as individual workers is an exciting development that’s happening in our town.

More information

“The major centre to a large and diverse business and industry sector on the Far West Coast of Eyre Peninsula” – Jodi

AG Town - Clare
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Cleve

Region: Eyre and Western
Known for: Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Other Broadacre crops
Council:
District Council of Cleve
Population:
789
Cleve is a prime example of a community working together to support the growth of agriculture showing  resilience in tough time with proactive programs to keep spirits up and bolster physical and mental wellbeing, as well as continuing to drive on-farm innovation.

Agricultural Overview

The Cleve agriculture district provides more than 74% of the region’s exports making it a leader and major contributor to the South Australian economy.

Mark & Andrea Hannemann’s (local farmers) water harvesting station, which provides water for surrounding farms who do not have mains water access. This has been a very successful innovation. Host of the bi-annual Eyre Peninsula Field Days event attracting thousands of attendees to the Eyre Peninsula. Hosting sheep dog training events at Sims Farm.

Community/Town Spirit

Cleve Area School Agriculture students take sheep to Adelaide for wool classing, meat classing and training competitions.Cleve Area School Agriculture students compete in the Royal Adelaide Show yearly and have proven very successful over the years across varied categories with their trained sheep.

AG Town - Cleve
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Coffin Bay

Region: Eyre and Western
Known for: Seafood and Aquaculture | Cereal Crops | Other Broadacre crops
Council:
District Council of Lower Eyre Peninsula
Population: 606
Coffin Bay has boosted the seafood industry, consistently delivering excellent quality oysters and showcasing South Australia nationally.

Agricultural Overview

Situated on the western tip of Southern Eyre Peninsula, Coffin Bay is 46 kilometres by road northwest of Port Lincoln. It boasts a steady growth in population and industry (aquaculture), with a permanent population of approximately 650, which swells to over 4,000 in the summer months.

Community/Town Spirit

Coffin Bay has an active commercial wharf in the town centre where you can watch the fishing boats unload their catches, including crayfish, pilchards, ocean jackets and sharks. There are also professional fishermen and abalone divers operating from the boat ramps. Their catches include octopus, sea urchins, sea snails, scallops, sand crabs, abalone, King George whiting and garfish. At the main boat ramp you will also see the oyster boats returning with baskets of the famous Coffin Bay oysters, from the many oyster leases within the bay system.

More information

Boasting beautiful coastlines and a great visitor experience.

“This little town immensely drives tourism and creates wonderful memories for all.”

AG Town - Coffin Bay
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Cowell

Region: Eyre and Western
Known for: Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Other Broadacre crops
Council:
District Council of Franklin Harbour
Population:
990
Cowell’s oyster farming industry employs many residents and locals while providing delicious oysters to the community. The town also has other active agricultural sectors including crop growing, sheep raising providing produce to the wider population.

Agricultural Overview

The whole community benefits from the agriculture industry, we have businesses that are directly and indirectly benefited by this industry. For example we have Landmark, Elders and Four Farmers who directly benefit from farmers purchasing goods and services and then businesses such as grocery stores, hairdressers who indirectly benefit as we have these farming families living in our community.

The Franklin Harbour region has been heavily effected by drought over the past few years, the Council initiated the creation of a paid position of Drought Coordinator who was employed by Council initially, this position ensured farming families were aware of support available in both forms of financial and wellbeing during the drought. They also organised events and seminars to get farming families off the farm and engage with others and to have a great day out, this was a fantastic initiative which saw lots of happy faces around the community. This position was such a success that we have seen other Councils adopt similar strategies and also the Red Cross has created a position to retain this initiative.

The events that have been held in our community over the past few years have seen both agricultural families and other community members get together to get through the drought, some of the events that have been huge success are: Golf day which was held on a farm Cricket on the sand bar (in the Franklin Harbour, only accessible by boat!) Family fun day including lots of activities for kids

Community/Town Spirit

High school farms contribute to the production and harvesting of crops, friendly locals host and hold events to contribute to the council and town economy.

More information

Has a very successful oyster industry as well as agriculture.

Best sausages are produced in Cowell at the Butchers – they have won many awards

“Friendly locals and the upgrading harbour make this town a fabulous place”

AG Town - Cowell
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Crystal Brook

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for:
Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Other Broadacre crops
Council:
Port Pirie Regional Council
Population:
1,324
Local agricultural based businesses are well supported by the community. Farmers will often hire local residents as employees to contribute to the town rather than someone who is coming from an external town.

Agricultural Overview

The local community facilities have benefitted from the strength of the PI sector, retaining hospital, school and doctor services when many others have lost these services.

Expansion of the local show program to include a school education day covering beef cattle, Marino wool and grains.

Hosted a Tom Curtin Outback Experience Show featuring horsemanship

Community/Town Spirit

Council and community have recently collaborated on a plan for a significant upgrade of the town’s main shopping street. Huge agricultural, sporting and community orientated town and district. Residents and local farmers take pride and care in the maintenance and cleanliness of roads and properties.

More information

Recently completed mural depicts regional life including Primary Industries.

AG Town - Crystal Brook
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Cummins

Region: Eyre and Western
Known for: Cereal Crops | Other Broadacre crops | Livestock Meat and Wool
Council: District Council of Lower Eyre Peninsula
Population:
726
Cummins is a town that is always looking at finding new ways to support and for new primary industry opportunities both directly and indirectly. The local produce encourages the community to ‘buy local’ and some meat producers offer an exceptional way forward with paddock to plate eating as well as highlighting sustainable practice.

Community/Town Spirit

The people bond together to help make the town a pleasant place to live and visit. Mosaics throughout the community toilets and around the town bring vibrancy to the town. The mens shed is a place where residents can gather and talk to each other and encourages community connection while they work to mend items for local residents.

More information

Cummins boasts a highly successful community bank and community hotel which both turn profits via grants and assistance package, back into the community. Both of these businesses rely heavily on trade from the agricultural industry to remain profitable and thus enhance the community.

AG Town - Cummins
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Greenock

Region: Barossa Gawler Light Adelaide Plains
Known for:
Grapes (Wine and Table) | Livestock Meat and Wool | Cereal Crops
Council:
Light Regional Council
Population:
954
Greenock is an emerging hub of viticultural and production with cellar doors, brewery, food production, eateries and accomodation. Notable for the tree-lined streets and shady peppercorn trees – the town is surrounded by vineyards.

Agricultural Overview

The Greenock hotel became a significant relay station for district mail coaches and teamsters hauling primary produce from the Barossa Valley and copper from the Kapunda Mines.

Community/Town Spirit

Greenock is a picturesque village within the Barossa Valley and delivers a great lifestyle with friendly local hospitality and events with quality wineries, a brewery, a cafe, a pub and boutique stores to enjoy.

More information

“An emerging hub of everything good about the Barossa.”

AG Town - Greenock
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Hamley Bridge

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for: Cereal Crops | Other Broadacre crops | Livestock Meat and Wool
Council: Wakefield Regional Council
Population:
613
Hamley Bridge is on the edge of the Adelaide plains and contains diverse cropping and animal production farms. Within 5KMs of the township there are 6 poultry farms, 2 piggeries and the rest of the land is cropped with a variety of grains.

Agricultural Overview

Numerous cropping trials are conducted every year by various chemical companies egBayer and plant breeders eg AGT. Showing commitment to increasing yields and producing new and better varieties.

Local townspeople have received seasonal employment. Local business’s have benefited by supply of consumer goods and family support also supplied skilled services back to the farmers.

Community/Town Spirit

After the devastation of the Pinery fire, which burnt most of the Adelaide Plains – the town and surrounding farmers have banded together to build many houses and sheds. Two local agricultural bureaus keep the town in touch with modern technology.

More information

Hamley Bridge is an old railway town made famous for its change of gauge and was the first country town in SA to have power.

“Born and bred in the community my whole life has been involved in agriculture and this picturesque landscape has been my  heart and soul. The town has offered me sporting, religious and social opportunities.” Richard

AG Town - Hamley Bridge
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Hay Valley

Region: Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu and Kangaroo Island
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Vegetables | Fruit – Apples, Pears and Cherries, Strawberries
Council: Mount Barker District Council
Population:
25
Hay Valley holds generations of passionate growers that produce the best Australian produce from Brussel sprouts, to sweet strawberries & apples, prime beef & lamb.

Agricultural Overview

New working craft brewery and small batch distillery that also is a benchmark project for sustainability and renewable energy with 1700m of solar panels. A waste water treatment plant is used to harness two onsite bores that can purify water and contribute to the beer and distillery process, through to the crops and orchids.

More information

“Generations of family businesses growing the finest food for our state.”

AG Town - Hay Valley
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Jamestown

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for:
Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Other Broadacre crops
Council:
Northern Areas Council
Population:
1,392
With a rich history, Jamestown agricultural and farming sector supports the local community and economy predominately through cereal crops and livestock.

Agricultural Overview

Jamestown show has grant funded for new shearer training facility that will be used to train new shearer’s and wool handlers. It will also be the host to the 2021 National Shearing Championships. Local irrigation research project located in Jamestown.

Community/Town Spirit

The farming community work as part of the community alongside businesses to keep the town strong and prosperous, the volunteer rates in the council area surpass many other regions. The new tourism website highlights the potential for staying in Jamestown while visiting the Southern Flinders, the town has produced a new book due for publication in October that was created by volunteers.

More information

Jamestown will be celebrating 150 years in 2021.

AG Town - Jamestown
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Kadina

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for:
Cereal Crops | Other Broadacre crops | Livestock Meat and Wool
Council:
Copper Coast Council
Population:
4,587
Kadina surrounds form an important agricultural base for the region, and are used for growing cereal crops. Farming lands are mostly used for broadacre cereal cropping, with staples such as wheat, barely and oilseeds/legumes like canola, chickpeas and field peas all commonly grown in the area.

Agricultural Overview

The top products are wheat, barley, legumes, lentils, peas, beans, meat, beef and lamb.

Successfully pitched for government funding of the Cooper Coast Food Art and Wine Festival. This has funded another new local and community infrastructure project nationwide.

Community/Town Spirit

Community supports YP Field Days and Volunteer Groups assist in running the event. The Primary Industries sector provides employment directly and indirectly. Small rural towns wouldn’t survive without the Primary Industries sector.

More information

Kadina is the largest town in the Copper Coast. Kadina is the shopping hub of the Copper coast and all of the local machinery dealers are located in Kadina. This allow the primary industries sector to get local parts and service quickly.

“The Primary Industries sector is the lifeblood of our community. It supports our businesses, sporting clubs and generates wealth that turns over and over through the community.”

AG Town - Kadina
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Kapunda

Region: Barossa Gawler Light Adelaide Plains
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Cereal Crops | Grapes (wine and table)
Council:
Light Regional Council
Population:
2,598
The Kapunda farming community has embraced science, adapting new technologies and fostering a culture of innovation which has resulted in greater production and/or increased productivity in agriculture and viticulture.

Agricultural Overview

A least 46 per cent of the Barossa Valley’s vineyards are situated within the Light Regional Council’s boundary. Industries in the town connected to agriculture are exporters, employers and innovators in the sector, whilst the farming community are the backbone of community programmes.

Regional growth is supported by job creation and retention and generating ways to attract people to the regions. As a result of building a new $20m pellet producing mill, JT Johnsons employed extra staff with a further positive impact coming in the form of indirect employees, e.g. transport and mechanical staff. The company’s staff numbers currently stand a 105. Its adoption and promotion of biosecurity measures has a significant impact on protecting the region and the state’s valuable agricultural assets.

The sector has a long history (dating back to the settlement of SA) that has been continued and expanded in our area. The recent opening of the new $10m Foodland Supermarket in Kapunda has provided our farmers and local community with a well-stocked facility with dozens of products not normally available in the town. It is estimated that prior to the opening of this supermarket that 70 per cent of the community shopped at nearby Nuriootpa, Gawler, Munno Para, Salisbury and Elizabeth. Lesser mileage and the costs associated have also meant more visitors to the town, and as a result more staff (including farmer’s family members) are employed in comparison to the former, now closed Foodworks supermarket.The sector has a long history (dating back to the settlement of SA) that has been continued and expanded in our area. The recent opening of the new $10m Foodland Supermarket in Kapunda has provided our farmers and local community with a well-stocked facility with dozens of products not normally available in the town. It is estimated that prior to the opening of this supermarket that 70 per cent of the community shopped at nearby Nuriootpa, Gawler, Munno Para, Salisbury and Elizabeth. Lesser mileage and the costs associated have also meant more visitors to the town, and as a result more staff (including farmer’s family members) are employed in comparison to the former, now closed Foodworks supermarket.

Community/Town Spirit

The Kapunda community and its industry have demonstrated resilience in the fact of drought and bushfires (in the instance of the Pinery Fire) and rebuilt its industries. JT Johnsons assured its farming suppliers of any help they could render, plus donated substantial supplier of food. Members of the Kapunda community are involved in leadership activities that contribute to growth in agriculture/regional development within their town and more broadly across the state. JT Johnsons, as members of the Australian Fodder Industry Export Committee and Agri Futures Export Hay Panel impart updates to its farming suppliers via an annual get-together and personally.

AG Town - Kapunda
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Karoonda

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for: Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Vegetables
Council:
District Council of Karoonda East Murray
Population:
351
Founded on wheat growing, Karoonda now has a number of agricultural and horticultural industries represented in the district including raising merino sheep.

Agricultural Overview

Provided a Drought Support & Resilience Coordinator to coordinate a series of events and activities to the rural community to not only recover from drought but be better prepared for the next. Used drought communities fund in an agricultural friendly manner while still addressing the communities needs.

Community/Town Spirit

Our regions and those engaged in agricultural pursuits need the support of towns and the services therein to remain connected and vibrant. This is what helps to ensure the continuity of farming operations by creating communities with interest that are attractive and desirable, to encourage people to stay. The heritage walk also provides a expose on the history of the town as an important railway town as the heart of the Mallee where the Marino sheep and the sheeves of grain are celebrated.

More information

“The initiative and pride shown by the community has encouraged tourism and education of those visiting the town.”

AG Town - Karoonda
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Keith

Region: Limestone Coast
Known for:
Vegetables | Wool | Crops for Hay
Council:
Tatiara District Council
Population:
1,076
The local industry of the town Keith is predominantly grain production and livestock grazing. More recently, olive production has been gaining momentum around the area with a large processing plant opening recently.

Community/Town Spirit

Keith is recognised as the Gateway to the South East and Limestone Coast. It was proclaimed in 1889 with agriculture as its base, and with its distinctive purple paddocks, is well known as the “Lucerne capital of Australia”.

In the early days, a railway siding was established on the Adelaide line near Mt Monster to serve the pastoral leases that had been taken up in the surrounding district during the 1850s.

Another kind of rail is a popular feature in Keith today – the mono-rail in Don Moseley Memorial Park is well loved by travellers and local kids (and adults) alike.

Keith’s annual Diesel and Dirt Derby draws thousands of rev-heads from all over Australia and overseas to the town each March, which is followed by the V8 Speed Boat Challenge.

The Derby began from humble origins in 2012, as a local event to raise money for the Keith & District Hospital. It is now a major regional event with funds raised being reinvested in infrastructure around the Showground precinct and create the superb facility it is today.

A busy service centre to a diverse agricultural area, ‘community’ is at the heart of Keith. The town not only features the Keith & District Hospital, a not-for-profit, community organisation that has been servicing the area for 60 years, but also The Purple Paddock, a community run hub that offers a wide range of locally made and unique products including baked goods, preserves, handmade items and plants.

More information

Keith has been referred to as the lucerne capital of Australia.

AG Town - Keith
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Kimba

Region: Eyre and Western
Known for:
Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Other Broadacre crops
Council:
District Council of Kimba
Population:
629
Kimba is leading the region’s reputation today as one of South Australia’s major grain belts, known for its high standard of product including: Grains, Meat & Wool whilst diversifying into other areas to ensure ongoing economic sustainability.

Agricultural Overview

The local Ag bureau Buckleboo Farm Improvement Group (BIG FIG)  is well known all over the state for being one of the high achievers when it comes to accessing funding and and running a large range of trials.This has helped not only our local community but has paved the way for a lot of farmers all over the state to try new farming practices to improve their soil health and make higher returns. This bureau is run by a young and highly motivated team of farmers that are always looking to find new ways to better manage what the farmers already have.

The District and surrounding areas as a whole have benefited from the growth in the area and the significant economic on flows to alternate businesses and organisations with the continual endurance of Kimba’s Ag Community through unprecedented times.

Kimba is a highly motivated progressive town that is only moving forward.

The biggest projects that Kimba is in the process of is the grains accumulation facility and truck stop proposed by  Eyre Hub which is another farming group of forward thinking farmers trying to value add to our grains industry and help support our town.

Eyre Hub has already had plans drawn up for the site and is currently in the process of finding funding and getting large grain companies on board. The truck stop which was only just an extra idea has now become one of the biggest potential add ons  and could provide a new way to help Kimba move forward into the future.

With Kimba being halfway across Australia and with the trucking industry being so hell bent on efficiency these days, this provides a great opportunity for Kimba to be the ideal place to be the new change over stop. Trucks can get to Kimba and home from every state with two up drivers without any lengthy stop overs.

Community/Town Spirit

Community hub set up in a disused tractor shop for makers, creators, hobbies and small businesses to help grow their businesses. The community is driven and committed to developing the Eyre Hub with visions of offering commodity storage of grain, Processing, bulk freight and other services.

More information

Kimba development group have sought to improve tourism features in the area namely the solar lit silo art.

“A town of forward thinkers, doing their best to improve Agriculture and the town as a whole.”

AG Town - Kimba
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Kingston/Taratap South East

Region: Limestone Coast
Known for: Livestock Meat and Wool | Crops of Hay | Grapes (wine and table)
Council:
Kingston District Council
Population:
1,648
Located on the Limestone Coast, Kingston/Taratap South East’s main industries are fishing, wine-making, and sheep and cattle farming.

Agricultural Overview

In 2015/16, the total value of agricultural output in the Kingston District Council area was $114m. The largest commodity produced was Livestock slaughterings, which accounted for 73.4% of the Kingston District Council area’s total agricultural output in value terms.

More information

“The essence of a strong and connected community group.”

AG Town - Vote for Kingston/Taratap South East
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Langhorne Creek

Region: Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu and Kangaroo Island
Known for:
Grapes (Wine and Table) | Livestock Meat and Wool | Vegetables
Council:
Alexandrina Council
Population:
427
A significant major wine and grape production region known for the vineyards and wineries, Langhorne Creek is also the home to two of the biggest Brussel sprouts farms in Australia. In amongst the vines, some bakeries grow their grains.

Agricultural Overview

Individual wineries actively pursuing external funding opportunities to improve their business and in particular the visitor experience. Most recent successes Bremerton Wines and Lake Breeze Wines securing matching funding creating new experiences with circa $4M investment.

Cellar Treasures 14-15 August Weekend initiative – showcasing rare and collectible wines from Langhorne creek producer’s cellars and the Handpicked Music Festival at Lake Breeze Wines have stimulated the local economy.

Numerous viticultural research activities including clonal selection work on Malbec in association with AWRI and Wine Australia

Community/Town Spirit

Langhorne Creek’s local businesses and residents take great pride in the Agricultural capabilities of their town seeing success entering into the Royal Adelaide Show and other country shows as well as supporting the local school program.

More information

Langhorne Creek is one of Australia’s oldest wine regions

“The town has made a great effort to highlight the beautiful wine region and the many cellar doors.”

AG Town - Langhorne Creek
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Lenswood

Region: Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu and Kangaroo Island
Known for:
Fruit – Apples, Pears and Cherries | Grapes (Wine and Table) | Livestock Meat and Wool
Council:
Adelaide Hills Council
Population:
485
Lenswood is known for growing apples. pears, cherries and also a variety of grapes. With new apple varieties being planted throughout the regions and obtains from around the world to deliver high quality fruits.

Agricultural Overview

The district predominantly supplies apples, pears and cherries to local, interstate overseas markets. More recently, several vineyards have been established.

Lenswood’s central position in the Adelaide Hills orchard districts led to a large cold storage facility being built there in 1933. Called the Lenswood Coldstore Cooperative, the facility has storage for 400,000 bushels of fruit, processing mostly apples, pears and cherries.

Community/Town Spirit

After facing two consecutive years of severe hail damage in 2018 & 2019, the residents and farmers continue to show resilience and push on with crops.

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“The resilience from the recent Cudlee Creek fires, has shown the town rally its strength and continue to produce their finest produce.”

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Loxton

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for: Citrus Fruit | Grapes (Wine and Table) | Nuts
Council:
District Council of Loxton Waikerie
Population:
3,838
The town of Loxton is rapidly growing for wine-growers, broadacre crops and research and development on farming practices. Most notably a pro-active fruitfly program which controlled and eradicated the recent fruit fly outbreak stopping the negative effect on the agricultural industry.

Agricultural Overview

The Loxton Research Centre is the home of the centre of excellence for the Australian Almond industry, championing exciting new research for Australia’s fast growing almond industry. The centre also is supporting and promoting our global reputation as a leader in agriculture and producer of premium food and wine from our clean environment.

Community/Town Spirit

Wonderful citrus, grapes, almond and local regional produce is available to the public from the stalls at the market. The local community support programs.

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Lucindale

Region: Limestone Coast
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Grapes (Wine and Table) | Crops for Hay
Council:
Naracoorte Lucindale Council
Population:
230
Naracoorte Lucindale Council is central to some of Australia’s best wine producing areas with all of the Wrattonbully and parts of both the Padthaway and Coonawarra wine regions within the district. There are several seed processors and distributors, as well as some horticultural production.

Agricultural Overview

In 2015/16, the total value of agricultural output in the Naracoorte-Lucindale Council area was $256m. The largest commodity produced was Livestock slaughterings, which accounted for 49.8% of the Naracoorte-Lucindale Council area’s total agricultural output in value terms.

The Naracoorte Lucindale Council has lobbied for a suitable intersection to cater for long heavy vehicles to improve the efficiency of their respective businesses and safety of other road users on the highway. This project will be commencing soon.

Community/Town Spirit

Lucindale has hosted the South East Field Days for more than 40 years (unfortunately cancelled in 2020 & 2021 due to the pandemic), promoting agricultural innovation and bringing more than 12,000 attendees each day over 2 days

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Strong agricultural program at Lucindale Area School with a full boarding house and all years from R-12 participating in agricultural education using the school farm facilities. Lucindale students regularly achieve success in showing cattle sheep and goats, as well as wool shows and wine label competitions. The farm also has pig, chicken and aqua-cultural enterprises, along with vegetable gardens. Local farmers are involved in the school farm program, donating their livestock, time and expertise.

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Maitland

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for: Cereal Crops | Other Broadacre crops | Livestock Meat and Wool
Council:
Yorke Peninsula Council
Population:
1,029
Maitland is known for best management practice when working with agronomists and machinery specialists to target inlets to crop need and minimise grain loss at harvest. The town also uses of a wide range of grain crops and export oat hay to improve sustainability of rotations and diversity of weed control approaches -herbicides, harvest seed destructor, grazing.

Community/Town Spirit

Despite being drought declared in 2019 and impacted by fire our community continued to support regions in worse positions by providing fodder and emergency service crews. The high land prices and high land values mean that farming is just as big a gamble and stress as in other regions but the ups and downs can be even bigger. The statewide Fat Farmers exercise and mental health group was started by farmers in Maitland.

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In 2022 Maitland celebrates 150 years since foundation. From then to now the town has stories of farmers pioneering change and advancing agricultural. And not just males. Maitland has a long history of leading female farm business owners including first settler Mrs Roger’s.

“The successful and sustainable agriculture helps sustain jobs and businesses in our community that supply farming and farm families.”

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Mannum

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Cereal Crops | Vegetables
Council:
Mid Murray Council
Population:
2,398
Located in Riverland, Mannum is the main onion producing area of the region, with the local farmers building a packing and distribution centre for their onions helping to provide extra jobs for locals and increase distribution efficiency for fresh onions to Australia.

Agricultural Overview

A 100-megawatt solar farm has been proposed for a site near Mannum. which would provide enough energy to power 34,700 households, saving 167,000 tonnes of carbon emissions every year. It would also create 300 jobs.

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McLaren Vale

Region: McLaren Vale Preservation District
Known for:
Grapes (Wine and Table) | Vegetables | Livestock Meat and Wool
Council:
City of Onkaparinga
Population:
3,096
A premium grape growing area, McLaren Vale supports sustainable viticulture and has achieved quality improvement across the region from tactics it has promoted and shared through the community.

Agricultural Overview

Grape and food production is the backbone of McLaren Vale, contributing to the economic prosperity of the town and forming the rich heritage and culture of the community. The McLaren Vale township is the heart of one of the most famous and marketable wine regions in the world.

The clean, green environment coupled with sustainability and history that’s unique to McLaren Vale are the reasons people choose to live in McLaren Vale and visitors come to visit.

Being ‘clean, green and sustainable’ is what sets McLaren Vale product apart and fits with increasing consumer demand for connection with the food and beverage they’re consuming. With 37 per cent of vineyards in the McLaren Vale region being Certified Organic/Biodynamic (compared to 4 per cent nationally), it’s no wonder the McLaren Vale brand is well known internationally by consumers and respected by farmers.

McLaren Vale’s agricultural reputation has flowed into the tourism and hospitality industries, which attracts 1.2 million visitors spending $210 million annually to the City of Onkaparinga. Visitors are drawn to the region and more specifically McLaren Vale, to connect with wine makers and food growers, experience the beauty of vine covered hills and delight in tasting the freshest produce.

Tourism and hospitality is now one of the biggest employers, with McLaren Vale being a premium food and wine destination, surrounded by hills and coast. The success of the agricultural industry has intertwined with the tourism and hospitality industry with both building on each other’s strengths and challenging for improvement and innovation.

Sustainability in winemaking

The McLaren Vale born Sustainable Australia Winegrowing Program is a series of viticultural initiatives that provide best practice sustainability benchmarks. These initiatives were developed with the objective to improve viticultural practices, fruit quality and financial viability in the region. From July 2019, the program was renamed to Sustainable Winegrowing Australia (SWA) and became Australia’s inaugural single sustainability program for viticulture in Australia.

Community/Town Spirit

Agriculture forms an integral part of the McLaren Vale community and economy.

From first sight, it’s easy to see McLaren Vale is built around grape and food production. Rolling hills covered in rows of vines creates a lasting first impression of McLaren Vale. The names of famous grape growing families line the pavement of the mainstreet and local wine brands keep the local football club well sponsored. It’s easy to see for growers and makers, community and livelihoods are intertwined. A strong, thriving agricultural industry is an essential part of the local and regional economy. In 2018 12.8 million litres of wine was exported and with 190 producers, including 80 cellar doors, grape growing and wine making is a key economic driver. According to the ABS, in 2018-19 wine grape crops from the City of Onkaparinga had an approximate value of $22.8 million per year, with a majority being grown in the highly prized terroir of McLaren Vale.

Food production is also vital for the economy and McLaren Vale produce is a feature of the Willunga Farmers Market (WFM). WFM is an excellent example of the connection between community, growers and visitors. Established in 2002, WFM was the first South Australian farmers market. Eighteen years later, WFM is an icon of Willunga, attracting locals and visitors to sample and purchase the best produce from McLaren Vale and the region direct from the grower. The combination of premium food and wine form the basis of a flourishing tourism industry that injects $210 million into the economy annually.

More information

Gulf of St Vincent coastline borders McLaren Vale’s Geographical Indicator – Saint Vincent is the official patron saint of winemakers!

“With a long and proud agricultural history, McLaren Vale township is the thriving heart of a region renowned for producing some of the world’s best wines and premium produce. McLaren Vale’s sustainable approach to farming and viticulture, its central location within a region with State-recognised protected special character, and its passionate and innovative residents, food producers, grape growers and winemakers, have earned this charming town its international reputation for ‘clean and green’ produce. This wonderful town is a “Must Visit” destination for local, interstate and international tourists seeking to immerse themselves in SA’s premium wine industry. McLaren Vale is also known by locals and visitors alike as a place of generosity, quirkiness, creativity and community.”

AG Town - McLaren Vale
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Melrose

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for:
Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Other Broadacre crops
Council:
District Council of Mount Remarkable
Population:
347
The historic town in the Flinders Ranges, Melrose is known for its exceptional mountain bike trails with a strong foundation of agriculture keeping the community connected and supporting the local economy.

Community/Town Spirit

This quiet and attractive town, which is nestled below Mount Remarkable, has had a colourful history characterised by farming on very marginal land and mining poor deposits of copper. Today it has a number of interesting historic buildings and there are pleasant bush walking tracks in the surrounding countryside.

More information

Known as the Oldest Town in the North.

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Meningie

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Cereal Crops | Milk
Council:
Coorong District Council
Population:
852
Meningie supports irrigated agriculture, dairy farming, broad acre cropping, fishing and water-based tourism. Agricultural lands to the east of Lakes Alexandrina and Albert support grazing of modified and improved pastures and cereal cropping.

Agricultural Overview

Soils are variable and include calcareous soils, sand over clay, deep sands, areas of shallow soils overlaying calcrete, and the locally specific Poltalloch soil; a clay over sand which occurs exclusively on the on the floodplains of Lakes Alexandrina and Albert.

Community/Town Spirit

Being adjacent to the Lower Lakes, the Millennium Drought had a large impact on this area and acted to unite and galvanise the community giving rise to a number of community initiatives such as the large scale revegetation projects seen along the Princes Highway.

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Millicent

Region: Limestone Coast
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Milk | Grapes (wine and table)
Council:
Wattle Range Council
Population:
4,734
Millicent is a smaller regional community founded on Agriculture. The township and surrounds rely heavily on the production of cattle and sheep, grain and seed production, horticultural value adding facilities, niche agricultural products and the production of feed.

Agricultural Overview

The local Saleyards have over $10m in sales per annum and there ae two stock feed pelletising plants, a new dried milk processing plant, new Oil Seed production facility, large scale live herb production facilities and the farmers sustain three larger agribusiness supply companies. Farmers grow specialty seeds (over $3m in value) which are also exported.

Community/Town Spirit

The community has successfully hosted events like the National Grasslands Society conference where the latest in technology and systems were promoted and hosted a leg of the International Bio Char conference in 2019. The town holds one of the larger Agricultural Shows each year which is well supported. The Council has undertaken business planning and reviews for a new small-scale service kill abattoir, a large regional food value adding precinct to be developed on the outskirts of the township and is investigating opportunities for value adding to local broad bean and canola seed crops. The community is supporting initiatives for bio mass and bio char production. Latest technology is constantly being adopted by agricultural operations across the area and several inward and outward-bound trade missions have been supported recently. We embrace our youth to sustain the sector and work closely with educational and other facilities in the development of school agricultural based programs.

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Monarto

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Vegetables | Milk
Council:
The Rural City of Murray Bridge
Population:
209
Celebrated for the famous Monarto Zoo, the town of Monarto has a active agricultural community predominately in crops including wheat, oats and barley.

Agricultural Overview

In a bid to protect the livelihood of local growers and producers, as well as protecting the community and international assets, like Monarto Zoo, the Monarto ag bureau created their Harvest Alert Project, which received a commended award at the recent ‘Resilient Australia Awards.’ in 2018. The project was chosen for introducing and maintaining infrastructure which monitored local weather conditions and provided real time alerts to registered users.

Community/Town Spirit

Most residents of Monarto run small hobby-like farms, raising cows, sheep and horses.

More information

Monarto is a diverse community being home to agricultural, tourism through the Monarto Safari Park and light industry.

“Monarto is a community which is home to a variety of industries which are able to support the importance of agricultural in the community.”

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Moonta

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for:
Cereal Crops | Other Broadacre crops | Livestock Meat and Wool
Council:
Copper Coast Council
Population:
4,174
Moonta’s rich history has earned the town national heritage status boosting one of the largest copper mines in SA and a buoyant agricultural industry.

Community/Town Spirit

Responsible for the introduction of the Cornish pasty and other Cornish related cultural events. Very community driven and focused.

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“A great family getaway holiday.”

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Moorook

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for:
Citrus Fruit | Grapes (Wine and Table) | Nuts
Council:
District Council of Loxton Waikerie
Population:
189
Moorook, home of Nippy’s Orange Juice, is a town producing products that are sold in Australia and exported overseas.

Community/Town Spirit

Moorook is one of a series of villages and towns that encircle a group of lakes and lagoons that make up the Riverland region and encompass the Murray River floodplain and wetlands.

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Mount Barker

Region: Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu and Kangaroo Island
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Vegetables | Fruit – Apples, Pears and Cherries, Strawberries
Council:
Mount Barker District Council
Population:
16,629
Mount Barker has seen huge growth over the past few years. The town has the largest recycled water treatment facility in the state with a focus on sustainable practices.

Agricultural Overview

In the 2015/16 year agriculture contributed to $70.4M in revenue, mainly from live stock and vegetables.

The proposed pumped hydro energy storage project from AGL would considerably strengthen the regional economy and provide significant benefits for the community, including growth in the agriculture and horticulture industries with new employment and flow on jobs for export markets and processing.

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Mount Gambier

Region: Limestone Coast
Known for:
Forestry and Logging  | Livestock Meat and Wool | Milk
Council:
City of Mount Gambier 
Population:
26,148
Mount Gambier is the regional hub servicing the meat, crop and wine industries in the surrounding areas, and home to one of the largest agricultural shows each year.

Agricultural Overview

The city rallied to meet the demands of hosting a Medi Hotel during the COVID19 pandemic to help Victorian travellers who were unable to get back to their hometown.

In 2015/16, the total value of agricultural output in the City of Mount Gambier was $3m. The largest commodity produced was livestock slaughterings, which accounted for 50.8% of the City of Mount Gambier’s total agricultural output in value terms.

Community/Town Spirit

The Mount Gambier A&H Society provide the community with a show every year, with an Agriculture Learning Centre that has been developed to promote programs and activities of our schools through the theme of agriculture. Children will learn about agriculture through a range of static and interactive displays, presentations and activities. The will be encouraged to touch, taste, look, listen and learn about farming and food production.

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Mundulla

Region: Limestone Coast
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Vegetables | Crops for Hay
Council:
Tatiara District 
Population:
314
Mundulla is a small but thriving town set in beautiful big red gum country, just 10 kilometres southwest of Bordertown, being judged ‘Best Small Town in SA’ for three consecutive years. The annual Mundulla Show and Moot Yang Gunya Festival sees nearly 3000 people flock to the town to this major country show.

Agricultural Overview

Residents have instituted a three-bin recycling and waste system, solar panels and all residents use rain water.

Community/Town Spirit

Local groups often meet to exchange ideas, discuss farming practices and common challenges, farm problems and method discussion.

More information

Different from many other small towns in close proximity to a larger centre, the town boasts a range of local businesses including a General Store offering a range of takeaway food options, The Old Mundulla Hotel and even an antique store.

A wide range of period rural architecture is on show in Mundulla, with a number of original Mundulla houses dating from the early 1900s.
Pride and community spirit is reflected in the town’s excellent sporting and service facilities. The picturesque Mundulla Showground is the venue for most sports and the Mundulla Show and Moot Yang Gunya Festival held on the first weekend in March is one of the biggest events in the Limestone Coast region.

“Such a beautiful friendly town, where community means everything” – Annie

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Murray Bridge

Region: Murraylands and Riverland 
Know for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Vegetables | Milk
Council:
The Rural City of Murray Bridge
Population:
16,804
A sprawling rural centre surrounded by a major agricultural district, Murray Bridge is driven by dairying, chicken raising, pig breeding, tomato and snow pea growing.

Agricultural Overview

Murray Bridge is recognised as the regional centre in the Murraylands and as such is able to provide opportunities at all levels in creating a viable ‘food bowl’ – from research and development, growing, harvesting and production for sale including marketing internationally.

Community/Town Spirit

Murray Bridge High School have an Agricultural Farm where children from farming families learn about agriculture. There was a spring garden competition organised by the council.

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Mypolonga

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Vegetables | Citrus
Council:
The Rural City of Murray Bridge
Population:
475
Home to varied products including grain, meat, soft fruit, citrus, honey – and has a burgeoning young population of new families.

Agricultural Overview

Mypolonga has embraced new migrants and industries, it also has one of the most well-renowned primary schools of the state. History of the town is also being recorded and on display in the local hall. Growth has provided ongoing support to small businesses such as Aussie Apricots; Woodlane Orchards; Mypolonga Produce and others.

Community/Town Spirit

The Community works together to embrace the local agricultural sector through small business development opportunities and celebrating the history of the soldiers’ settlement.

More information

Home to the only buffalo farm in South Australia.

Celebrating the history of the community through displays within the local hall.

“Mypolonga demonstrates a community that works together in promoting the agricultural diversity and history of the area and a desire to explore new initiatives in the agricultural sector to ensure ongoing sustainability.”

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Myponga

Region: Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu and Kangaroo Island 
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Milk | Crops for Hay 
Council:
District Council of Yankalilla 
Population:
393
Myponga is a prime dairying real estate, thanks to the Mediterranean climate and the cluster of dairies and production facilities. The region boasts its benefits, usually associated with areas off the beaten path – clean air, a tight knit community and minimal noise pollution.

Agricultural Overview

A sheep and beef property in Myponga is implementing innovative farming solutions to improve productivity and protect natural resources, including restoring native vegetation to watercourses. The work includes woody weed control, revegetation of watercourses with native species, erosion remediation, rabbit control and preparing and installing fencing.

 

The dairy industry has certainly faced its fair share of challenges, particularly the farmers battling low milk prices. This has been felt in Myponga, as the state of the industry over time has forced many dairy farmers out of business. During the mid-to-late 1900s, it was home to about 40 dairy farms – now there are about a dozen. More than a decade ago, the Fleurieu Milk Company began to change the landscape of the dairy industry for this little town, when they ‘went out on their own’ and invited South Australian’s to buy their locally produced milk. The community certainly responded! Fleurieu Milk Co. has seen sustained strong growth and these days delivers hundreds of thousands of litres of fresh milk across South Australia and beyond via its own distribution arm. The company’s success ripples into the industry and community, as they have grown they have been able to take on more local farmers to supply to their factory at Myponga. The factory keeps growing and these days Fleurieu Milk Co. employs more than 40 people.

Community/Town Spirit

Myponga is home to the Fleurieu Milk Company, that supports the local community through producing employment and gaining suppliers from local dairy farms. They are also a major sponsor of the Myponga Football, Netball & Community clubs. There is a strong sense of community in Myponga, where the residents understand that by supporting local producers the town will continue to grow and prosper. Myponga has been an undersold piece of the Fleurieu Peninsula, but that’s all changing as forward thinking locals in Myponga take on opportunities for their community and industries that are driving regional development with future generations in mind.

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Naracoorte

Region: Limestone Coast 
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Grapes (Wine and Table) | Crops for Hay 
Council:
Naracoorte Lucindale Council 
Population:
5,074
Naracoorte has a wealth of diverse agriculture, cropping, viticulture, cattle, sheep, local meat works, World Heritage Caves, Minijumbuck factory, dairy industry.

Agricultural Overview

Naracoorte has achieved considerable fame because of the importance of the impressive caves. In recent times the area south of the town has begun to see a significant wine industry beginning to develop – with extensive vineyards being planted at Koppamurra.

The Naracoorte Lucindale Council has lobbied for a suitable intersection to cater for long heavy vehicles to improve the efficiency of their respective businesses and safety of other road users on the highway. This project will be commencing soon.

In 2015/16, the total value of agricultural output in the Naracoorte-Lucindale Council area was $256m. The largest commodity produced was Livestock slaughterings, which accounted for 49.8% of the Naracoorte-Lucindale Council area’s total agricultural output in value terms. Naracoorte Regional Livestock Exchange has generated $1.412B over past 10 years in sales, improvements in services and competitive prices has made the Naracoorte Regional Livestock Exchange (NRLE) attractive to sellers and buyers, as one of the State’s best facilities. The ten year average is approximately 94,000 cattle, and 429,000 sheep and lambs per year. Qube Logistics is the sole freight provider for Teys Australia packaged meat products in Naracoorte and has grown commensurate with Teys Australia growth in output.

These two businesses are sited on opposite sides of the Wimmera Highway on the outskirts of Naracoorte.

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Normanville

Region: Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu and Kangaroo Island
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Milk | Crops for Hay 
Council: District Council of Yankalilla 
Population:
1,906
Agriculture is one of the biggest economic drivers in the district, with livestock production being the biggest contributor. Normanville is enveloped by a working agricultural landscape and acts as a hub for producers to sell their products and value-add, allowing farmers to value-add their primary production by selling directly to tourism and hospitality operators and selling at the Normanville Farmers Market.

Agricultural Overview

There has been a renewed interest in the Normanville Meatworks site, becoming a solution for artisan / local meat production and processing (although the site remains closed). If this site can get up and going it is expected to generate dozens of full-time equivalent jobs. Also, the region’s biennial festival ‘Festival Fleurieu’ celebrates the connection of arts and agriculture.

Meanwhile, the recently launched Normanville Farmers Market provides a significant outlet for producers to sell their produce. Lastly, the Yankalilla Area School (the school for the community of Normanville) is reviving it’s Agricultural Centre, encouraging students to consider a career path in agriculture while also building awareness of where our food and fibre comes from.

Normanville is the storyteller of our agriculture industry and supplies local produce to tourism and hospitality operators. Our landscape and our heritage is moulded by agriculture, giving rise to the beautiful townships and surrounds Normanville, making Normanville the District’s largest visitor township.

Community/Town Spirit

Normanville’s heritage is built on the unique and methodical way agriculture lands were laid out during colonial settlement. Forestry reserves on the outskirts of the township are also being utilised to provide recreational opportunities for the community and visitors, such as walking, cycling, mountain biking and horse riding, with linkages back into the town. They also contribute through Tourism and Community development, by creating a village green on a former petrol station site, as the council has moved to a more sustainable community and industry focus in recent years.
The council’s forward planning considers development ‘infill’ rather than the urban sprawl of Normanville to protect farmland.

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Nuriootpa

Region: Barossa Gawler Light Adelaide Plains
Known for:
Grapes (Wine and Table) | Livestock Meat and Wool | Cereal Crops 
Council:
The Barossa Council
Population:
5,691
The Wine Innovation Cluster is expanding the use of Nuriootpa Research Centre as the main viticulture field research site in south eastern Australia.

Agricultural Overview

The Nuriootpa Viticulture Experiment Station was established in 1937 as the major centre serving South Australia’s wine grape industry. At the time, the Barossa Valley was the centre of the wine grape industry with other major production districts being in the outer suburbs of Adelaide, Clare Valley, Riverland and South East.Today (2014), the complex is known as Nuriootpa Research Centre and houses staff from PIRSA, SARDI (a Division of PIRSA), and Rural Solutions SA.

More information

“An invaluable hub of the Barossa Valley with a great community that contribute to the numerous industries” – Mel

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Parndana (KI)

Region: Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu and Kangaroo Island
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Cereal Crops | Crops for Hay
Council:
Kangaroo Island Council
Population:
149
The farming community of Parndana works closely with tourism sector and conservation groups. Sheep farming practices have successfully diversified to ensure longevity and environmental conservation.

Agricultural Overview

There’s an excellent Agricultural Class at our Parndana Campus, allowing students to attain the knowledge required to build on the foundation of our unique farming community.

During the fires Parndana was the initial hub for coordinating the CFS fire response, until the town was evacuated. After the fires Parndana became the key location for recovery with Blaze aid setting up on the community oval, the local town hall became the depot for distributing clothing, food and household items to those who had lost everything and the Recovery Centre is still operating out of the old Health Centre. All these recovery activities have occurred to support the local fire impacted farming community.

Whilst the local community is the immediate beneficiary from the local ag sector, in reality the whole Island and state benefits. The farm land surrounding Parndana contributes economically and socially to the well being of the whole region. The town in turn supports the region providing goods and local support businesses, a school and the important social connection through the local pub and sporting fixtures.

Community/Town Spirit

After the fires, the town has banded together to rebuild primary industries to look ahead and not backwards. Also to help one another to get the farms back on track with their individual farms needs to keep primary industries going. The people of Parndana, with support from the wider community of Kangaroo Island came together , fought together and are rebuilding together, showing true grit and determination that are a tribute to the strength and resilience of small towns everywhere.

There is no doubt the agricultural production in the area would have been much worse for 2020 had the community of Parndana not acted in the selfless, brave and united way they did.

More information

Parndana was established after the Second World War to support the Soldier Settlement Scheme on Kangaroo Island. The name “Parndana” means “The Place of Little Gums”.

It was proclaimed in 1951, making it SA’s second youngest town after Roxby Downs.

“This vibrant little town effectively demonstrates the true meaning of community” – Kylie

AG Town - Parndana (KI)
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Peterborough

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Cereal Crops | Other Broadacre crops
Council:
District Council of Peterborough
Population:
1,416
Peterborough is a town in the mid north of South Australia, in wheat country. Peterborough has a strong agricultural community predominantly in livestock, cereal crops, and other Broadacre crops.

Community/Town Spirit

Peterborough are putting a big focus into social media, promoting what’s happening in the community & town to encourage visitation and increase tourism revenue.

AG Town - Peterborough
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Pinnaroo

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for:
Vegetables | Livestock Meat and Wool | Cereal Crops
Council:
Southern Mallee District Council
Population:
547
Pinnaroo is a major centre for the surrounding wheat, barley, sheep and mixed farming area. Although the area is a traditional rural centre, the natural underground water supply is diversifying the land use with market gardening of potatoes and onions.

Agricultural Overview

Pinnaroo is the largest potato growing area in Australia and is also a broad acre farming district.

Community/Town Spirit

The Pinnaroo community is very progressive and committed to seeing the community thrive. The annual show exhibits wool, pets, plants and floriculture, farm machinery, traders and food stalls.

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“A progressive community that wants the community to thrive” – Andrea

AG Town - Pinnaroo
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Port Augusta

Region: Far North
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Transport and Support Services 
Council:
Port Augusta City Council
Population:
12,896
Port Augusta is home to the first solar-powered facility for tomato farming in Australia. The $200 million hi-tech, capital-intensive system growing food sustainably and cleanly for Australians.

Agricultural Overview

Port Augusta is also home to a new world-leading national sterile insect technology (STI) Facility that was commissioned in 2016 – when full production is reaches this high-tech facility will be able to produce up to 20 million sterile male Queensland fruit fly each week. The sterile males being released into the wild and helping to collapse wild populations in fruit fly affected growing regions.

Port Augusta has contributed $753M to the Far North’s GRP.

Tomato farm produces 17,000 tonnes of truss tomatoes a year and holds up a 10-year supply contract with Coles Australia. The tomato farm was the first of its kind in the world, and uses sunlight and seawater and generated jobs for over 170 people. The use of freshwater displaces the use of more than 2 million litres of diesel per year.

Community/Town Spirit

The unique location of this town gives the option to explore the Spencer Gulf by kayaking, swimming or even catching kingfish. The community of Port Augusta is committed to continuously innovating its agriculture practices and sustainability efforts.

AG Town - Port Augusta
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Port Broughton

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for:
Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Other Broadacre crops 
Council:
District Council of Barunga West
Population:
1,034
A large and diverse fishing fleet with Blue Swimmer crabs and marine scale net fishing being at the forefront. Those involved are leaders in their industry continually advocating for a clean and sustainable fishery to continue to provide world class seafood to the plates of south Australians.

Community/Town Spirit

The region is home to some young and enthusiastic farmers and agronomists who are pushing the boundaries with their trials and farm practices to progress the industry. A lot of the farmers and agronomists belong to a local soil improvement group who are continually striving to enhance the industry and move forward with techniques and technology.

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“A diverse and progressive town with focuses on broadacre cropping and livestock” – Matthew

AG Town - Port Broughton
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Port Lincoln

Region: Eyre and Western 
Known for:
Seafood and Aquaculture | Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool 
Council:
City of Port Lincoln 
Population:
14,064
Trademarked as the ‘Seafood Capital of Australia’, Port Lincoln provides most of the regions seafood processing and fishing jobs.

Agricultural Overview

The economy is based on the huge grain-handling facilities, the canning and fish processing works, lambs, wool and beef, and tuna farming for the Japanese market, with 99% of tuna being exported to Japan.

Home of Australia’s largest commercial fishing fleet, Port Lincoln now has a thriving aquaculture industry that farms the following species: southern bluefin tuna, yellowtail kingfish, abalone, mussels, oyster and experimentally, seahorses and spiny lobsters.

AG Town - Port Lincoln
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Port Pirie

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for:
Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Other Broadacre crop
Council: 
Port Pirie Regional Council 
Population:
13,740
Known for the smelting of metals, the town also has important grain silos to service the region. Supported the establishment of an additional grain handler and marketer in Port Pirie to provide increased market options for growers.

Agricultural Overview

Port Pirie is one of the world’s largest primary lead smelting facilities, generating significant employment and economical gain. The Nyrstar smelter – operating since the 1880s – hires more than 700 employees. In 2012 Port Pirie Regional Council completed a $5m Community Water Recycling project with Nyrstar which allows 350ML of water to be reused from the smelter.

Community/Town Spirit

Regional Service Centre for adjoining rural areas providing high quality sporting facilities and a range of events.

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“A great community and Agricultural town in regional SA” Nicky

AG Town - Port Pirie
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Renmark

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for: Nuts | Grapes (Wine and Table) | Citrus Fruit 
Council:
Renmark Paringa Council
Population:
7,659
Renmark has lead the way in balancing production agriculture and environmental health.

Agricultural Overview

Renmark was the first irrigation settlement in Australia and has been at the forefront of the irrigation industry since. Recently, the Renmark Irrigation Trust was the first irrigation/agricultural entity in the world to be awarded gold level certification for its inaugural audit for a water stewardship program – an accolade further enhanced by the re-accreditation to platinum level at the next audit.

AG Town - Renmark
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Robe

Region: Limestone Coast
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Seafood | Crops for Hay
Council:
District Council of Robe
Population:
998
Agriculture is a high value industry across all sectors, and this money flows into & supports the local economy.Red Meat, Wine, Seafood, Dairy (Cows & Camels), Horticulture (Potatoes & Onions), Forestry, Cropping (inc. ceral, legumes & hay), Sheep Stud, Cattle Stud, Aquaculture.

Agricultural Overview

Historically Robe was built on fishing and farming, however overtime it has supported many other agricultural industries, both large and small. Great underground water, guaranteed rainfall & quality soils has allowed the Robe district to diversify into many other fields.

In 2015/16, the total value of agricultural output in the District Council of Robe was $37m. The largest commodity produced was livestock slaughtering, which accounted for 73.4% of the District Council of Robe’s total agricultural output in value terms.

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“Our district is vibrant, progressive & blessed with a proactive community, one that seeks & provides opportunities for the community to develop both socially & economically.”

AG Town - Robe
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Robertstown

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for:
Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Crops for Hay 
Council:
Regional Council of Goyder
Population:
248
A traditional country town that services a wide area. Robertstown now have multiple solar power stations around the town and a wind farm.

Community/Town Spirit

The Community is a very strong one and the local General Store owner is 87 years old and still running the store.

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“They persist year in, year out – even after the past three years of drought and late rains” – Tanya

AG Town - Robertstown
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Roseworthy

Region: Barossa Gawler Light Adelaide Plains
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Cereal Crops | Grapes (Wine and Table) 
Council:
Light Regional Council
Population:
948
With recent growth in smaller businesses in the industrial area feeding out to the local primary and farming taking place in the surrounding areas, Roseworthy is a growing agricultural town.

Agricultural Overview

Australia’s first agricultural college was founded in Roseworthy in 1883. Since its establishment, Roseworthy Agricultural College has been recognised as the premier teaching facility for the sector and close partnerships with industry and government research groups have always been a feature of Roseworthy’s development. In 1991, the Roseworthy Agricultural College joined forces with the University of Adelaide’s Faculty of Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences.

Many of the best-known names in agriculture and wine are graduates of Roseworthy and in more recent times, it has become the key campus for research and education in animal production and dryland agriculture.

Community/Town Spirit

After surviving the 2015 bushfires, the resilience by residence and community to stay in surrounding areas and rebuild have kept the primary industries going. By increasing employment and local businesses in primary industries – the town has also been able to continue to employ a good percentage of locals.

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“A small community helping the outer and surrounding communities through these tough unprecedented times” – Cheryl

AG Town - Roseworthy
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Roxby Downs

Region: Far North
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Transport and Support Services 
Council:
Municipal Council of Roxby Downs
Population:
3,588
The town of Roxby Downs is the home to a large number of contractors, BHP Billiton employees and the community whose families provide services to the town with a strong agricultural foundation.

Agricultural Overview

17% of the Far North gross regional product revenue is from Roxby Downs ($533M)

Community/Town Spirit

The town boasts a pool, numerous sporting facilities, a supermarket, jewellery store, theatre and gallery, community radio station, and even an old video chain store that has been converted into a community hub for the many young families who occupy the town.

The local community board encourages residents to participate in activities that help shape the community. As the community is transient, to help with the change of people coming and going – the council has created “moving to Roxby downs’ calico bags that contain information and resources for living in Roxby.

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“Offering a relaxed and family oriented lifestyle, it’s the modern town of the outback” – Curtis

AG Town - Roxby Downs
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Strathalbyn

Region: Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu and Kangaroo Island
Known for:
Grapes (Wine and Table) | Livestock Meat and Wool | Vegetables 
Council:
Alexandrina Council
Population:
5,489
Strathalbyn is a major hub to the north-east of the Alexandrina region with an annual Agricultural Show incorporating livestock displays (beef cattle, dairy cows, sheep, alpacas, miniature goats and dairy goats), indoor displays of cut flowers, cookery, needlework, floral art, craft, photography, fruit, vegetables, eggs, grains, produce, and preserves.

Community/Town Spirit

Equal parts charm and history with a generous helping of incredible local produce and wine, the Strathalbyn community is a passionate and proud group who are committed to seeing the town thrive.

AG Town - Strathalbyn
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Streaky Bay

Region: Eyre and Western
Known for: Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Crops for Hay 
Council:
District Council of Streaky Bay 
Population:
979
The district has done a number of things to grow its primary industries – not just in agriculture but in aquaculture and fishing. A $1m upgrade to the Streaky Bay Boat Ramp supports both the professional fishing industry and the local oyster growers for improved access and the town continues to fund the upgrade and maintenance of heavy vehicle routes to ensure grower and carrier safety, for heavy vehicles shifting agricultural freight and commodities.

Agricultural Overview

2019 saw the introduction of the Long Table Lunch – this event saw the National Wine Centre from Adelaide come over and showcase our local produce, from local abalone, honey, oysters, fish and meat, accompanied by a regional wine offering, the event hosted 100 people including the then Minister for Tourism, local Members of Parliament and the General Manager of the National Wine Centre, the event was an outstanding success, people travelled from across the state to attend the event showcasing a premium food offering.

Streaky Bay Marine Products developed a local food van, located at the front of their premises, in which they offer during peak seasons, a variety of seafood products all caught locally, promoting the quality of local seafood, Streaky Bay Marine products continue to have a strong export and local market and also opened a factory in Adelaide in the past few years

Eyre Wolf Abalone have continued to develop their product showcasing around the world and nationally.

EP Cruises have developed a local Ocean to Plate cruise offering people the opportunity to catch their own crabs, pick oysters from the baskets and then cook them on a specialised platform, promoting the oyster and shellfish industry, encouraging visitors to then purchase oysters locally in town.

Evans Oysters have created an online platform for the delivery of oysters to metro and urban areas throughout South Australia and Interstate, this was introduced following covid and has raised the profile of Streaky Bay oysters across the state and beyond.

Community/Town Spirit

The local community has developed a local health and wellbeing group that has supported primary producers in tough times through events, support networks and promotion of wellbeing services. The town community has continued to provide great support to the wider farming district during the past twelve months in uncertain times of lack of rainfall and COVID 19 stopping tourism.

The town relies on tourism to help keep businesses viable that the farming community need the services.

AG Town - Streaky Bay
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Swan Reach

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Grapes (Wine and Table) | Citrus Fruit
Council:
Mid Murray Council 
Population:
209
Swan Reach is home of almond farms, citrus farms and many grape vines. The massive almond processing plant has created a lot of jobs within the region while contributing to the economy as a whole. The main produce being almonds citrus, avocados, grapes, potatoes and onions.

Agricultural Overview

Swan Reach is primarily a horticultural and broad acre farming community.

Community/Town Spirit

The community supports other nearby towns, e.g the pub sourcing meat from the Mt Pleasent Butcher.

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“Just a beautiful country town on the river” – Shona

AG Town - Swan Reach
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Tintinara

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for: Livestock Meat and Wool | Cereal Crops | Milk 
Council:
Coorong District Council 
Population:
266
Home of South Australia’s largest feedlot – currently feeding 17,500 cattle for a mix of domestic and export meat products, Tintinara aims to achieve excellence in integrated farming and feedlot operations.

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“A welcoming community, with a proud heritage.” – Morna

AG Town - Tintinara
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Victor Harbor

Region: Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu and Kangaroo Island
Known for: Livestock Meat and Wool | Milk | Crops for Hay 
Council:
City of Victor Harbor 
Population:
15,265
The town of Victor Harbor has a focus on issues such as long term water security, accessibility to a regional abattoir supporting service works and improved engagement with government agencies led by the Agribusiness Working Group.

Agricultural Overview

Rural landholders and farmers in the City of Victor Harbor will be given an extra helping hand with the 2020 release of the Rural Living Handbook that provides helpful information and guidance for settling into life in the district. The handbook provides new and prospective rural landholders with advice and guidance on the various aspects of managing rural property while providing references to support and assistance that is available to help new or new to the area property owners with embracing life on the land. Agribusiness contributes $39 million dollars to the Victor Harbor economy annually.

Community/Town Spirit

Victor Harbor has a passionate community with a foundation of promoting sustainable agricultural practices and a focus on mental health within the industry.

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“Victor Harbour is a lively and welcoming community with a strong passion for Agriculture” – Wendy

AG Town - Victor Harbor
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Waikerie

Region: Murraylands and Riverland
Known for:
Citrus Fruit | Grapes (Wine and Table) | Nuts
Council:
District Council of Loxton Waikerie
Population:
1,632
Waikerie provides much needed support for the actively expanding horticulture, viticulture and agricultural industries. Renown for citrus and wine, the town supports the growing vegetable industry and has a large almond farm. Cereal and live stock production help to make up the balance of the remaining land use.

Agricultural Overview

Agribusiness contributed $221 million dollars to the District Council of Loxton Waikerie annually in 2018/19.

Community/Town Spirit

Waikerie supports an active tourism industry with new recreation facilities that help tourists enjoy the beauty of the Murray River.

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“A great place to enjoy the beauty of the River Murray” – Peter

AG Town - Waikerie
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Wallaroo

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for:
Cereal Crops | Other Broadacre crops | Livestock Meat and Wool
Council:
Copper Coast Council
Population:
3,988
Wallaroo is the home of the Spencer Gulf Prawn fleet, the first prawn fishery in the Asia Pacific region that was certified sustainable by the internationally recognised Marine Stewardship Council.

Agricultural Overview

Most industries have made huge advances in crop rotation and fighting pests in the farmed grain.

The fishery alone in 2006/07 directly contributed over $56M to the State’s economy and $42M to the Eyre regions economy.

Community/Town Spirit

Originally a mining town for copper and metals, grain is now a big crop in Wallaroo. Plenty of farmers still work the land to farm grains.

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“Long, beautiful beaches, plenty of places to go fishing and diving spots where you can see all types of sea life make Wallaroo a great holiday destination in SA.”

AG Town - Wallaroo
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Wasleys

Region: Barossa Gawler Light Adelaide Plains
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool | Cereal Crops | Grapes (Wine and Table) 
Council:
Light Regional Council
Population:
348
Wasleys became a thriving centre and once operated three chaff mills. Though the chaff mills have ceased operating, the town is still a focal point for agriculture and farming livestock.

Agricultural Overview

In the 1860’s, a local farmer named Charles Mullen created a method of ploughing which was known as “Mullenising”. Mullen invented an implement, used throughout Australia, which was the precursor of the stump-jump plough.

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“It’s a lovely country town” – Merissa

AG Town - Wasleys
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Willunga

Region: McLaren Vale Preservation District
Known for:
Grapes (Wine and Table) | Vegetables | Livestock Meat and Wool
Council:
City of Onkaparinga
Population:
2,143
Olive groves & vineyards, organic farming, on-farm compost, reclaimed water, and solar power underpin the commitment to sustainable living and farming that is experienced across some lands in Willunga.

Community/Town Spirit

The Farmer’s Market provides a place where locals can sell local produce and products, including honey, vegetables, juices and olives

AG Town - Willunga
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Wirrabara

Region: Yorke and Mid North
Known for:
Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool | Other Broadacre crops
Council:
District Council of Mount Remarkable
Population:
230
Wirrabara reflects its proud heritage with an active timber industry, healthy farming community, creative business owners and a township that supports both the old and new.

AG Town - Wirrabara
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Woodside

Region: Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu and Kangaroo Island
Known for: Grapes (Wine and Table) | Fruit – Apples, Cherries and Pears | Livestock Meat and Wool
Council:
Adelaide Hills Council
Population:
1,870
Despite recent bushfires savaging the town and surrounding districts, the local farmers of Woodside are still producing and continuing to move forward after having lost crops, livestock and equipment. One thing the community and residents did not lose was their determination and love of the land.

Agricultural Overview

With a number of iconic South Australian businesses, Woodside is a strong community recovering from bushfires.

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On the fringe of Woodside is a collection of buildings used as an active army barracks from 1927 to 1981. After WWII it was used as a refugee camp, and again from 2010 to 2014, when refugee children attended local schools. The site has recently been purchased for housing development, which will be a great source of accommodation for seasonal workers in the agricultural sector.

In January 2020 Woodside hosted a stage start of the Santos Tour Down Under, bringing an international spotlight to the region and showcasing the resilience of the community, who were in recovery from the December 2019 bushfire. The community was so enthusiastic that their efforts won them Best Dressed Town for the 2020 competition.

AG Town - Woodside
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Wudinna

Region: Eyre and Western
Known for: Cereal Crops | Livestock Meat and Wool| Other Broadacre crops 
Council:
Wudinna District Council
Population:
549
The community of Wudinna have been highly involved in mental health programs as mental health in farming is a huge issue within regional communities and not often addresses. The town is known for being innovative and forward-thinking when it comes to agriculture.

Agricultural Overview

Wudinna District Council was one of the six winners of the inaugural SA Healthy Towns Challenge.

AG Town - Wudinna
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Yorketown

Region: Yorke and Mid North 
Known for:
Cereal Crops | Other Broadacre crops | Livestock Meat and Wool 
Council:
Yorke Peninsula Council 
Population:
642
Yorketown is a small rural service town surrounded by wheat, barely and sheep farms as well as over 200 salt lakes. The town and community of Yorketown have come together after recent bushfires with recovery efforts and collaboration with government, local industry groups and the CFS to educate residents on future fire prevention.

AG Town - Yorketown
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Yunta

Region: Far North
Known for:
Livestock Meat and Wool
Council:
Outback Communities Authority
Population: 85
Yunta is a progressive and cohesive community that has been successful in the SA Tidy Towns competition on a number of occasions.

AG Town - Yunta
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Eligibility and criteria

Who is eligible to be nominated?

  • Any regional town in South Australia can be nominated and enter the South Australian Agricultural Town of the Year award. ‘Regional’ is defined by those towns that are located within Areas 1-6 on the PIRSA Regions Map here, and the McLaren Vale Preservation District, Virginia and Gawler.
  • For the purpose of this award, ‘agriculture’ refers to all primary industries – agriculture (field crops, horticulture, meat and livestock, dairy, grape and wine, forestry), and fisheries and aquaculture.
  • A town’s involvement in agriculture is not limited to farmers, but includes the wider community that supports the industry – e.g. shops, service providers, community activities.

Criteria: Click here to download the criteria.

Next Stages and Program Timeline

19 August 2020 to 18 September 2020 — Nominations
October to November 2020 — Online voting by the public and judging panel to determine the top 5 finalists
November to December 2020 — Entry by the 5 finalists
Mid-January to Early-February 2021 — Regional visits to the 5 finalist towns
February 2021 — Announcement of the 2020 Agricultural Town of the Year
April 2021 — Community event

Next Stage:
Five finalists will be selected using the votes collected from the public and the independent judging panel.

Nominators of each of the 5 finalist towns for 2020 will be contacted for further information to help complete 4 additional entry questions outlined in the award criteria. They will also be connected with the town’s council and business associations, as well as other nominators to assist with this process.

As well as answering the 4 additional questions, each of the finalist towns will be invited to submit a video, photo gallery or other creative elements they feel support their application. Entries will need to be completed between November and December 2020.

The Top 5 towns will all receive a visit from the judging panel in Mid-January to February 2021 and will be required to submit an itinerary showcasing their town’s agricultural initiatives and supporting the questions/ themes they highlighted in their entry.

The 2020 Agricultural Town of the Year will be announced in February 2021.

Program Overview

Introduced as a new award in 2019, the Agricultural Town of the Year Award recognises South Australian towns that are excelling in agricultural practices and the flow on effect they have on communities.

The Agricultural Town of the Year Award, proudly presented by the Department of Primary Industries and Regions (PIRSA) and Solstice Media, highlights the vital role that agriculture plays in the regional landscape – being the backbone of most regional communities.

The program endeavours to provide an avenue where communities can learn from one another which will play a role in building capacity and increasing growth in regional South Australia.

*Population statistics shown are based on SSC, ULC or LGA 2016 census ABS website data.
**The information displayed is based on information provided by the nominators during the nomination stage of the program and any additional information easily found by Solstice Media or provided by councils.

2019 Event Program

2019 AGRICULTURAL TOWN OF THE YEAR AWARD WINNER

2019 Agricultural Town of the Year Award Winner

Cleve

Having faced the challenge of drought, Cleve’s community spirit and stories shared, are testament to the town’s resilience and creativity. A small community on the Eyre Peninsula, Cleve is an inspirational agricultural town that has employed a range of activities to improve efficiency and morale.

These include:

  • initiatives aimed at improving physical and mental health
  • continuing to drive farm innovation through field days and other programs
  • encouraging agricultural education programs at the local area school

The agriculture industry in the Cleve area contributes more than 74% of the region’s exports, making it a major contributor to the South Australian economy.

2019 Finalists

2019 REGIONAL SHOWCASE EVENT

2019 Regional Showcase Event